Past Webinars

  • Recorded: January 20, 2016 DITA-based technical documents are inherently sophisticated and complex hyperdocuments. They are developed through complex revision processes, often by highly-distributed teams. Thus DITA documents and their management present a number of challenges inherent in the nature of sophisticated technical documentation. While the value of this sophisticated approach to documentation has tremendous value to organizations as a whole, it can make the life of individual authors much more challenging, leading to the common complaint “DITA is too hard”. This talk presents the link and configuration management challenges inherent in sophisticated hyperlinked documentation and discusses the features of DITA and DITA component content management systems that address these challenges. If authors and managers understand the challenges inherent in DITA-based authoring they can at least set their expectations and provision tools and resources appropriately. What can attendees expect to learn?
    • The way in which DITA documents are sophisticated hyperdocuments
    • What “configuration management” means in the context of DITA-based documentation
    • The fundamental link and configuration management challenges DITA hyperdocuments present
    • The DITA features that enable and support hyperdocument
    • The link and configuration management features DITA-aware component configuration management systems must provide in order to support authors.
    • A little bit about Aikido
    Presented by Eliot Kimber, Contrext, LLC. Eliot Kimber is a founding and active member of the DITA Technical Committee. He has been working with structured markup for more than 30 years. Eliot is also a co-editor of the HyTime standard. Eliot currently focuses on the application of DITA to the business challenges of Publishers. Eliot is the founder and principal developer of the open-source DITA for Publishers project. Eliot lives and works with his family in Austin, Texas.
  • Recorded: April 5, 2017 Historically, technical content has been written for humans. But with the rise of artificial intelligence, machines will consume this content to solve problems automatically or help solve problems. This means that machines need to leverage the content in the easiest, most unambiguous possible way. Structured content authoring has been created to optimize the writing process (minimize cost and increase reuse). This way of writing has a lot of impact on what algorithms and content can do with it. Through a set of examples, we will review the benefits and limits of structured content, and how structured content impacts what modern tools and algorithms can do. Presented by: Fabrice Lacroix, Antidot Fabrice Lacroix is a known Web pioneer and the founder of Antidot, the company that puts enterprise content to work. As an entrepreneur, he has been working for 25 years on the development of the Internet and of the Web through several major companies.
  • Recorded: February 26, 2018 Although you don’t need DITA to write according to minimalism principles and you can certainly take a non-minimal approach when writing in DITA, the two go together like chocolate and peanut butter. In this presentation, Dawn explores the relationship between DITA, minimalism, and other technical communication best practices, demonstrating how each aligns with and complements the other. She provides guidance for forming your DITA information model and authoring guidelines to reflect writing best practices while maximizing the benefits DITA offers. Presented by: Dawn Stevens, Comtech Services at LearningDITA Live 2018 Dawn Stevens is President of Comtech Services, a content-management and information-design firm based in Denver, Colorado. She is also Director of the Center for Information-Development Management, a membership organization focused on content-management and information-development best practices. With over 25 years of experience, including 15 years at Comtech, Dawn has practical experience in virtually every role within a documentation and training department, including project management, instructional design, writing, editing, and multimedia programming. With both engineering and technical communication degrees, Dawn combines a solid technical foundation with strong writing and design skills to identify and remove the challenges her clients face in producing usable, technical information and training.